Social Science Daily

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museumofclassicalantiquities:

centuriespast:
Earring in the form of a three-lobed wineskin
Period: Parthian Date: ca. 2nd–1st century B.C. Geography: Mesopotamia, said to be from Nineveh Culture: Parthian Medium: Gold
The Metropolitan Museum

museumofclassicalantiquities:

centuriespast:

Earring in the form of a three-lobed wineskin

Period: Parthian Date: ca. 2nd–1st century B.C. Geography: Mesopotamia, said to be from Nineveh Culture: Parthian Medium: Gold

The Metropolitan Museum

latimes:

explore-blog:

The average earnings of young college graduates are still falling.

It’s still not a good day for good news. Recent grads, reblog with employment tips and we can put them together for a future post to help your fellow graduates!

latimes:

explore-blog:

The average earnings of young college graduates are still falling.

It’s still not a good day for good news. Recent grads, reblog with employment tips and we can put them together for a future post to help your fellow graduates!

(Source: )

A facial reconstruction of King Richard III unveiled on Tuesday.

A facial reconstruction of King Richard III unveiled on Tuesday.

(Source: nerdyjokes)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Bertha Parker Pallan (Cody) was one of the first female Native American archaeologists. Bertha was the expedition secretary for an archaeological dig in the Gypsum Caves of Nevada.  She is shown above displaying finds from the expedition.  Bertha also collected and preserved Yurok traditional narratives.  
In 1936, Bertha married Iron Eyes Cody.  In the 1950s, the couple hosted a television program about Native American history and folklore.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Bertha Parker Pallan (Cody) was one of the first female Native American archaeologists. Bertha was the expedition secretary for an archaeological dig in the Gypsum Caves of Nevada.  She is shown above displaying finds from the expedition.  Bertha also collected and preserved Yurok traditional narratives.  

In 1936, Bertha married Iron Eyes Cody.  In the 1950s, the couple hosted a television program about Native American history and folklore.

wehadfacesthen:

CPO Graham Jackson plays “Goin’ Home” mourning the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Warm Springs, Georgia, April 1945. A photo by Ed Clark.

I would be crying too :( 

wehadfacesthen:

CPO Graham Jackson plays “Goin’ Home” mourning the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Warm Springs, Georgia, April 1945. A photo by Ed Clark.

I would be crying too :( 

(via ryanshistoryblog)

Between 1938 and 1946 archaeologist Matthew W. Stirling (pictured) led eight expeditions to southern Mexico to study Olmec and Maya sites. In 1940 near Veracruz, he and his wife, Marion, excavated La Venta, a thousand-year-old Olmec ruin memorable for its massive and mysterious carved basalt heads.

Between 1938 and 1946 archaeologist Matthew W. Stirling (pictured) led eight expeditions to southern Mexico to study Olmec and Maya sites. In 1940 near Veracruz, he and his wife, Marion, excavated La Venta, a thousand-year-old Olmec ruin memorable for its massive and mysterious carved basalt heads.

(Source: National Geographic)

The Temple of the Sun was one of the buildings in the great Maya city of Palenque in southern Mexico. Palenque also held other temples, an aqueduct, and a palace with a three-story tower.

The Temple of the Sun was one of the buildings in the great Maya city of Palenque in southern Mexico. Palenque also held other temples, an aqueduct, and a palace with a three-story tower.

(Source: National Geographic)

ryanshistoryblog:

“A family group poses with dog, Indian domestic, and young children outside a log cabin in New Mexico Territory, ca. 1895.”
From: The National Archives

ryanshistoryblog:

“A family group poses with dog, Indian domestic, and young children outside a log cabin in New Mexico Territory, ca. 1895.”

From: The National Archives

burnedshoes:

© Larry Towell, 1996, Gaza City, Israel / Palestine

#1: Children playing with Palestinian flags over their heads in celebration of the independent Palestinian State

#2 Bombers’ graffiti and Palestinian youths in front of a Palestinian Hamas mosque

For generations now, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has become a geopolitical fact-of-life, a constant, like gravity. It is the world’s proverbial unsolvable puzzle, with the possibility of peace seeming, at most times, so out of reach that we often don’t allow ourselves to dream of it.

From 1993-1997, Magnum photographer Larry Towell made seven trips to Gaza, the West Bank and East Jerusalem, capturing the region and the almost quotidian violence that was present during and after the first Palestinian intifada. Today, in light of current events, The Daily Gallery revisits Towell’s work, for one of conflict photography’s greatest purposes is to serve as a reference that may allow us to learn from our past. (+)

» find more of Magnum Photos here «

(Source: burnedshoes)

A Young Reporter Chronicles Her 'Brain On Fire'

In 2009, Susannah Cahalan was a healthy 24-year-old reporter for the New York Post, when she began to experience numbness, paranoia, sensitivity to light and erratic behavior. Grasping for an answer, Cahalan asked herself as it was happening, “Am I just bad at my job — is that why? Is the pressure of it getting to me? Is it a new relationship?” But Cahalan only got worse — she began to experience seizures, hallucinations, increasingly psychotic behavior and even catatonia. Her symptoms frightened family members and baffled a series of doctors.

After a monthlong hospital stay and $1 million worth of blood tests and brain scans that proved inconclusive, Cahalan was seen by Dr. Souhel Najjar, who asked her to draw a clock on a piece of paper. “I drew a circle, and I drew the numbers 1 to 12 all on the right-hand side of the clock, so the left-hand side was blank, completely blank,” she tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies, “which showed him that I was experiencing left-side spatial neglect and, likely, the right side of my brain responsible for the left field of vision was inflamed.” As Najjar put it to her parents, “her brain was on fire.” This discovery led to her eventual diagnosis and treatment for anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, a rare autoimmune disease that can attack the brain. Cahalan says that doctors think the illness may account for cases of “demonic possession” throughout history.

1 year ago

... the plastic-made dreams: Coping Statements for Anxiety

psych-facts:

onlinecounsellingcollege:

According to Dr T.A. Richards, we can stop thoughts that lead to anxiety by consciously replacing them by more rational thoughts like the following:

When Anxiety is Near:

1. I’m going to be all right. My feelings are not always rational….

1 year ago - 2678
“The two different types of meditation training our study participants completed yielded some differences in the response of the amygdala — a part of the brain known for decades to be important for emotion — to images with emotional content,” says Gaëlle Desbordes, a research fellow at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at MGH and at the BU Center for Computational Neuroscience and Neural Technology, corresponding author of the report. 
“This is the first time that meditation training has been shown to affect emotional processing in the brain outside of a meditative state.”In the mindful attention group, the after-training brain scans showed a decrease in activation in the right amygdala in response to all images, supporting the hypothesis that meditation can improve emotional stability and response to stress. 
In the compassion meditation group, right amygdala activity also decreased in response to positive or neutral images. But among those who reported practicing compassion meditation most frequently outside of the training sessions, right amygdala activity tended to increase in response to negative images, all of which depicted some form of human suffering. No significant changes were seen in the control group or in the left amygdala of any study participants.
“We think these two forms of meditation cultivate different aspects of mind,” Desbordes explains. “Since compassion meditation is designed to enhance compassionate feelings, it makes sense that it could increase amygdala response to seeing people suffer. Increased amygdala activation was also correlated with decreased depression scores in the compassion meditation group, which suggests that having more compassion towards others may also be beneficial for oneself. Read full article 

“The two different types of meditation training our study participants completed yielded some differences in the response of the amygdala — a part of the brain known for decades to be important for emotion — to images with emotional content,” says Gaëlle Desbordes, a research fellow at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at MGH and at the BU Center for Computational Neuroscience and Neural Technology, corresponding author of the report.

“This is the first time that meditation training has been shown to affect emotional processing in the brain outside of a meditative state.”In the mindful attention group, the after-training brain scans showed a decrease in activation in the right amygdala in response to all images, supporting the hypothesis that meditation can improve emotional stability and response to stress.

In the compassion meditation group, right amygdala activity also decreased in response to positive or neutral images. But among those who reported practicing compassion meditation most frequently outside of the training sessions, right amygdala activity tended to increase in response to negative images, all of which depicted some form of human suffering. No significant changes were seen in the control group or in the left amygdala of any study participants.

“We think these two forms of meditation cultivate different aspects of mind,” Desbordes explains. “Since compassion meditation is designed to enhance compassionate feelings, it makes sense that it could increase amygdala response to seeing people suffer. Increased amygdala activation was also correlated with decreased depression scores in the compassion meditation group, which suggests that having more compassion towards others may also be beneficial for oneself. Read full article